JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898
JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898
JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898
JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898
JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898
JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898

JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY & OTTERBOURNE, C. Yonge 1st/1st 1898

Regular price $69.00 Sale

  JOHN KEBLE'S PARISHES: A HISTORY OF HURSLEY AND OTTERBOURNE, by Charlotte M. Yonge (An Old Inhabitant) ~ First Edition / First Printing, 1898 ~
Excellent Condition


 Publisher: MacMillan and Co., Limited, London (1898)

In overall excellent condition. Dark blue boards with gilt writing on spine; 234 pages. The boards and binding are solid and tight with minimal shelf-wear. The hand-cut pages crisp and clean, save for very small previous owner's stamp on the inside front board. No other marks of any kind in the book. Please see below for more information on John Keble!

John Keble
(25 April 1792 – 29 March 1866)

He was an English churchman and poet, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement. In 1833 his famous Assize Sermon on " National Apostasy  gave the first impulse to the Oxford Movement, also known as the Tractarian movement.  In 1835 he was appointed Vicar of Hursley, Hampshire, where he settled down to family life and remained for the rest of his life as a parish priest at All Saints Church. He was a profound influence on a near neighbor, the author and resident Charlotte Yonge at Otterbourne House in the adjacent village where Keble was responsible for building a new church.

Oxford Movement

The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism. The movement, whose original devotees were mostly associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of some older Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology. They thought of Anglicanism as one of three branches of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church. The movement's philosophy was known as Tractarianism after its series of publications, the Tracts for the Times, published from 1833 to 1841.