WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism
WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism

WHERE MAIN STREET MEETS THE RIVER, Hodding Carter 1st Ed 1952, SIGNED Racism

Regular price $79.00 Sale

  Where Main Street Meets the River, by Hodding Carter — First Edition, Second Printing 1952 HC/DJ — SIGNED African American Rights, Racism, Southern Politics — RARE

 Publisher: Hine Hart and Company, New York (1952)

Very rare, SIGNED copy of "Where Main Street Meets the River: The Personal Testament of a Man Who Has Become the Spokesman for the New South" by Hodding Carter. First edition, second printing. Carter was a well noted figure who fought against social and economic racism in the South through journalism and politics. This copy is in overall excellent condition. Signed by Carter on the first blank page. The boards and binding are solid and tight. The dust jacket is uncut and shows original price of $4.00. The pages are crisp and clean save for light toning around the page borders. The dust jacket shows very little wear, remarkable for a book of over 60 years old. A wonderful signed book by a political activist during the mid-century. Please see below for more information on Carter, his work, and efforts.

Edited Biography with Notable Achievements

He wrote editorials in the Greenville Delta Democrat-Times regarding social and economic intolerance in the Deep South that won him widespread acclaim and the moniker "Spokesman of the New South".

Carter wrote a caustic article for Look Magazine which detailed the menacing spread of a chapter of the White Citizens Counsel. The article was attacked on the floor of the Mississippi as a "Willful lie by a n****r-loving editor". Carter responded in a front-page editorial.

Carter was an unabashed supporter of the Kennedys and their quest for the American Presidency. He had dinner with Bobby Kennedy and his family the night before Kennedy was assassinated. Carter had also been working for him "campaigning, making talks, and writing ghost speeches".